Program

October 17th Saturday

October 18th Sunday


October 19th Monday


For presenters


October 17th Saturday, 10:10-11:10
Keynote Talk
(Chair: Toru Ishida)

  • Music Cultures Opened up by Music Technologies
    Masataka Goto


October 17th Saturday, 11:10-12:00
Session 1: Art and Design by Information Technologies
(Chair: Elke E. Reinhuber)

  • How to Pay Attention to the End of our Life: An Interactive Installation in Cultural Computing
    Kiarash Irandoust and Matthias Rauterberg
  • Projection Mapping Celebrating RIMPA 400th Anniversary
    Naoko Tosa, Ryohei Nakatsu, Pang Yunian, and Kosuke Ogata


October 17th Saturday, 13:00-15:00
Session 2: VR and Agents in Culture
(Chair: Matthias Rauterberg)

  • Perception of Affective Body Movements in HRI Across Age Groups: Comparison Between Results from Denmark and Japan
    Matthias Rehm, Anders Krogsager, and Nicolaj Segato
  • Modeling and Evaluating a Bayesian Network of Culture-Dependent Behaviors
    Birgit Lugrin, Julian Frommel, and Elisabeth André
  • Third-Person Augmented Reality-Based Interactive Chinese Drama
    Yanxiang Zhang and Abassin Fangbemi
  • Visual Point-Based Analysis of Laser-Scanned Historical Structures
    Wang Sheng, Atsushi Okamoto, and Satoshi Tanaka
  • Painting Based Enterable Tunnel-Like VR Space (Short Paper)
    Yanxiang Zhang


October 17th Saturday, 15:00-16:00
Poster Session 1 in parallel with Exhibition
(Chair: Mamiko Sakata)

  • Visual Arts for Reading the Original Texts of Makura no soshi and Tsurezuregusa
    Yasuhiko Saito
  • Urban Archiving for Smarter Cities: Archival Practices Beyond Open Data
    Elisabet M. Nilsson and Veronica Wiman
  • Clustering Word Co-Occurrences with Color Keywords Based on Twitter Feeds in Japanese and German Culture
    Daniel Moritz Marutschke, Sasha Krysanova, and Hitoshi Ogawa
  • New Approach of Cultural Aesthetic Using Sound and Image
    Yunian Pang and Naoko Tosa
  • Gender Stereotypes in Cultures: Experimental Investigation of a Possibility of Reproduction by Robots in Japan
    Tatsuya Nomura and Yuto Kinoshita
  • High-Realistic Acoustic Sound Field Reproduction with 16ch Head-Enclosed Loudspeaker-Array for Gion Festival Music
    Kota Nakahashi, Takahiro Fukumori, Masato Nakayama, and Takanobu Nishiura
  • Virtual Show, Go In!: Walk-through System and VR Goggles of a Temple for Museum Exhibits
    Asako Soga


October 17th Saturday, 16:00-17:30
Organized Session: The City's Intangible Cultural Heritage
(Chair: Matthias Rehm and Kasper Rodil)

  • Hybrid Cemetery Culture: Making Death Matter in Cultural Heritage Using Smart Mobile Technologies
    Jakob Borrits Sabra, Hans Jørgen Andersen, and Kasper Rodil
  • Building a Gamified System for Caputring MOOC Related Data: Smart City Learning Community as its Most Precious Source of Intangible Cultural Heritage
    Ljiljana Markovic and Adam Sofronijevic
  • Preserving Heritage Through Technology in a City Undergoing Change (Short Paper)
    Mathias Lyneborg Damgaard, Seth Van Heijster, Emil Byskov Nielsen, Kasper Rodil, and Matthias Rehm
  • Urban Archiving for Smarter Cities: Archival Practices Beyond Open Data
    Elisabet M. Nilsson and Veronica Wiman


October 18th Saturday, 10:00-11:00
Invited Talk
(Chair: Matthias Rauterberg)

  • Antoni Gaudí and his Role in Forming a Traditional Craft and Digital Culture Continuum
    Mark Burry


October 18th Sunday, 11:00-12:00
Session 3: Open Data for Culture and Computing
(Chair: Akira Maeda)

  • Comparing the Access to and Legibility of Japanese Language Texts in Massive Digital Libraries
    Andrew Weiss and Ryan James
  • A Computational Model for Conversational Japanese
    Peter L. Ihasz, Timothy H. Van, and Victor V. Kryssanov


October 18th Sunday, 13:00-14:30
Session 4: Digital Storytelling
(Chair: Ryohei Nakatsu)

  • Accessing Cultural Artifacts Through Digital Companions: The Effects on Children's Engagement
    Matthias Rehm and Martin Lynge Jensen
  • Indigenous Storytelling in Namibia: Sketching Concepts for Digitization
    Kasper Rodil and Heike Winschiers-Theophilus
  • Intuitive Curve Drawing Based Folktale Generator (Short Paper)
    Yanxiang Zhang, Thuy Duong Tran, and Abassin Fangbemi
  • An Example of Collaborative Online Writing in the Italian Language: "The Incipit" (Short Paper)
    Gabriele Rebagliati


October 18th Sunday, 14:30-15:30
Poster Session 2 in parallel with Exhibition
(Chair: Mamiko Sakata)

  • Character Image Database of Woodblock-Printed Japanese Historical Book Images
    Chulapong Panichkriangkrai, Liang Li, Keiko Suzuki, Ryo Akama, and Kozaburo Hachimura
  • Paper Analysis and Database of Papers of the Pelliot Collection, Dunhuang Manuscripts
    Shouji Sakamoto and Yoshihiro Okada
  • An Approach to Named Entity Extraction from Mongolian Historical Documents
    Biligsaikhan Batjargal, Garmaabazar Khaltarkhuu, and Akira Maeda
  • Personal Name Extraction from Japanese Historical Documents Using Machine Learning
    Noriyoshi Nagai, Fuminori Kimura, Akira Maeda, and Ryo Akama
  • Measurement of Unevenness of Korean Printed Books
    Kim Heakyoung
  • Multiplying the Narrative
    Elke E. Reinhuber


October 18th Sunday, 16:00-18:00
Social Events

  • Kyogen (Nor farce) : Binding up  棒縛(ぼうしばり)
    Venue: Kashokaku Noh-theater
    160-1, Saihojicho, Nakagyo-ku Kyoto-shi, Kyoto, Japan.


October 18th Sunday, 19:00-21:00
Banquet

  • Traditional Japanese Restaurant: Manshige
    Venue: Manshige (Traditional Japanese Restaurant)
    9-1, Shibaomiyacho, Kamigyo-ku Kyoto-shi, Kyoto, Japan.


October 19th Monday, 10:00-12:00
Session 5: Culture in Social Networks
(Chair: Birgit Lugrin)

  • Cultural Networks and the Future of Cultural Analytics (Short Paper)
    Juan-Luis Suárez, Ben McArthur, and Adriana Soto-Corominas
  • Ranking Recipes According to Classicality Towards Understanding Evolution of Food Preference
    Yichen Wen, Yasuhito Asano, and Masatoshi Yoshikawa
  • Capturing Sub-Saharan African Sociality in Social Networks to Generate a Culturally Realistic Population
    Colette Faucher, Jean-Yves Bergier, and Mathilde Forestier
  • An Examination of the Culture of Impartiality in Wikipedia, A Case Study of the Islamic World Representation in the English and Persian Versions of the Wikipedia
    Somayeh Bahrami, Mojtaba Touiserkani, and Majid Reza Momeni
  • One Touch Character: A Simplified Japanese Character Input Method for Mobile Computing
    Masanobu Higashida, Toru Ishida, Jin'ichi Murakami, and Masahiro Oku


October 19th Monday, 13:00-15:00
Session 6: Intercultural Communication and Collaboration
(Chair: Naomi Yamashita)

  • The Use of Formal English Language and ICT Input Sources Among Japanese University Students (Short Paper)
    Jeremy White and Peter Lajos Ihasz
  • What You See is What You Annotate - Intercultural Comparisons on Multimodal Observations
    Kristiina Jokinen
  • Intercultural Communication Environment for Youth and Experts in Agriculture Support
    Toshiyuki Takasaki, Yohei Murakami, Yumiko Mori, and Toru Ishida
  • Subjective Interpretation of Directive Terms: Methodology and Preliminary Results
    Christopher K. Frantz, Swetha Keertipati, Martin K. Purvis, and Maryam Purvis
  • Evaluation of the Validity of Back-Translation as a Method of Assessing the Accuracy of Machine Translation
    Mai Miyabe and Takashi Yoshino


October 19th Monday, 15:00-16:00
Demonstration Session in parallel with Exhibition
(Chair: Takashi Yoshino and Yuu Nakajima)

  • A Data-Visualization Tool for Analyzing Ukiyo-e's Pictorial Themes
    Keiko Suzuki and Shinya Saito
  • Multiagent Gaming System for Multilingual Communication
    Yuu Nakajima, Reiko Hishiyama, and Takao Nakaguchi
  • Developing Digital Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest Software to Promote Historical Culture by Applying Virtual Reality Technology
    Zhaoxi Ni and Zhiqiang Gao
  • An Image Digital Archive for Substantiating the Acculturation of Clothing Culture in Japan
    Haruko Takahashi


October 19th Monday, 16:00-17:00
Session 7: Information Environments for Analysis of Culture
(Chair: Juan-Luis Suárez)

  • Content Sharing in Global Brand from Geographic Perspective
    Amit Pariyar, Yohei Murakami, Donghui Lin, and Toru Ishida
  • A Proposed Cultural Difference Detection Method Using Data from Japanese and Chinese Wikipedia
    Takashi Yoshino, Mai Miyabe, and Tomohiro Suwa


Information for Presenters

<<Oral Presentations>>

  1. Please refer the program for your session time.
  2. We suggest you to use your own laptop computer. A projector with D-sub connector will be provided. Please test that your computer works with the projector before the session.
  3. Please be present at the presentation room and introduce yourself to the session chair at least 10 minutes before your session starts.
  4. Full papers will be allocated 25 minutes, including questions and answers. The suggested presentation time is 20 minutes, and the suggested Q&A time is 5 minutes.The timekeeper will announce the remaining time when 18 minutes are passed.
    Short papers will be allocated 15 minutes, including questions and answers. The suggested presentation time is 10 minutes, and the suggested Q&A time is 5 minutes.The timekeeper will announce the remaining time when 8 minutes are passed.

<<Poster Presentations>>

  1. The poster sessions will take place on Saturday (Poster Session 1) and Sunday (Poster Session 2).
  2. The recommended size of a poster is A0 size in portrait orientation. Push-pins will be provided to mount your poster to the board.
  3. Authors of posters will be expected to display and present their work and answer questions about their poster to conference participants during the assigned sessions.
  4. Authors of each paper can use a table (W180 x D600 x H700), 2 chairs, Wi-Fi access, and a few 100v sockets. Other equipments (e.g., Laptop PCs, Monitors, or etc.) should be prepared by authors themselves.
  5. Posters can be mounted during 12:00pm to 13:00pm before your poster session. Posters should be removed by 19:00pm in order to make way for the posters and demos of the following day.

<<Demonstrations>>

  1. The demonstration sessions will take place on Monday (Demonstration Session).
  2. Authors of each paper can use a table (W180 x D600 x H700), 2 chairs, Wi-Fi access, and a few 100v sockets. Other equipments (e.g., Laptop PCs, Monitors, or etc.) should be prepared by authors themselves.
  3. Authors of demos will be expected to display and present their work and answer questions about their demo to conference participants during the assigned sessions.
  4. Settings of demonstration must be ready before the demonstration session starts.